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u10 & u12 Riverhawk team rosters

PEEWEE & BANTAM TRYOUT NUMBERS & TIMES for OCTOBER 3rd & 4th

Initiation Level (Mite) Parent Meeting

Initiation Level (Mite) Parent Meeting
Thursday, October 2nd
6:30pm-8:30pm
Middle School East - Cafeteria

More info on the Mite level will be coming soon!


ATTENTION: COMMUNICATION CHANGE!!

Going forward, any information that needs to be communicated from The Board will be sent through the Ngin System. What this means is that when you receive an email the "from" will now read:  no-reply@stma.pucksystems2.com and will appear as "no-reply".  Jen Tourville will no longer appear in the "from" line.

The email address(es) you provided when you registered will be the email address(es) used.  If you would like to add, delete or change your email contact information please log into your Ngin account and make the appropriate changes.

Baseline Concussion Testing

Skaters ages 10 years + (siblings welcome)

Saturday, October 4th from 9:00 am - 12:00 pm at  STMA HS computer lab.

$8.00 CHECKS TO STMAYHA, OR EXACT CHANGE PLEASE.

Admittance for testing on the half hour beginning at 9:00 am.

Last admittance at 11:30.

Any questions, contact Sharon Oakvik 763-497-9905

Volunteers needed, will be posted on DIBS.

Skills Clinics & Tryout Calendar (revised 09.26.14)






      Siteheader

      Calendar STMA

      • Sep
      • 30
      Bar Bingo - Neighbors
      • Oct
      • 2
      Mite Parent Meeting
      • Oct
      • 4
      Baseline Concussion Testing
      • Oct
      • 4
      Bar Bingo - Neighbors
      • 2:00pm- 4:00pm (CDT) Ical_event_icon
      • Neighbors Eatery & Saloon
      • Come out and play bingo!  Two large jackpots available each week!

      • Tag(s): Association Events 
      • Oct
      • 7
      Bar Bingo - Neighbors
      • Oct
      • 11
      Bar Bingo - Neighbors
      • 2:00pm- 4:00pm (CDT) Ical_event_icon
      • Neighbors Eatery & Saloon
      • Come out and play bingo!  Two large jackpots available each week!

      • Tag(s): Association Events 
      • Oct
      • 14
      Bar Bingo - Neighbors
      • Oct
      • 18
      Bar Bingo - Neighbors
      • 2:00pm- 4:00pm (CDT) Ical_event_icon
      • Neighbors Eatery & Saloon
      • Come out and play bingo!  Two large jackpots available each week!

      • Tag(s): Association Events 
      • Oct
      • 20
      October Board Meeting
      • 7:00pm- 9:00pm (CDT) Ical_event_icon
      • Middle School East, Health Room D, 400
      • Tag(s): Association Events 
      • Oct
      • 21
      Bar Bingo - Neighbors
      • Oct
      • 25
      Bar Bingo - Neighbors
      • 2:00pm- 4:00pm (CDT) Ical_event_icon
      • Neighbors Eatery & Saloon
      • Come out and play bingo!  Two large jackpots available each week!

      • Tag(s): Association Events 
      • Oct
      • 28
      Bar Bingo - Neighbors
      • Nov
      • 1
      Bar Bingo - Neighbors
      • 2:00pm- 4:00pm (CDT) Ical_event_icon
      • Neighbors Eatery & Saloon
      • Come out and play bingo!  Two large jackpots available each week!

      • Tag(s): Association Events 
      • Nov
      • 4
      Bar Bingo - Neighbors
      • Nov
      • 8
      Bar Bingo - Neighbors
      • 2:00pm- 4:00pm (CST) Ical_event_icon
      • Neighbors Eatery & Saloon
      • Come out and play bingo!  Two large jackpots available each week!

      • Tag(s): Association Events 

      Team News

      Brag about your team!!

      11/24/2012, 10:45pm CST
      By stma

      Send a photo and brief article!!

      We want to share your tournament successes right here!  Send a photo and a brief article to the website coordinator and your team success will be shared here!! 
      Go Knights!!  Go River Hawks!!

      Prepare Your Child with Nutrition and Rest

      10/01/2010, 11:30pm CDT
      By MN Hockey

      From MN Hockey

      One of the most important aspects of youth sports is having the young ones prepared with proper rest and nutrition. To make sure your child is ready to have fun and compete to the best of his or her ability, follow some of the following tips. 

      Before starting a game or practice, kids need to have their bodies ready with fuel and adequate rest. Unfortunately, trying to fix these issues just before game time won’t work. Food takes time to digest before it can be used as fuel.

      With too little rest or poor nutrition, a child’s performance can vary considerably from past efforts. During a game, a player needs lots of energy. To produce this energy, the body needs the right kinds of food.

      Foods high in complex carbohydrates contain energy that is easier for the body to use. Foods containing protein are essential for proper growth and development but are harder for the body to quickly convert to energy. Foods high in complex carbohydrates include:

      • Pasta
      • Breads
      • Rice
      • Oatmeal
      • Beans
      • Potatoes
      • Bananas

      Although these foods are all good for producing energy, too much of a good thing can cause a player to feel sluggish during a game. Players should avoid eating big meals too close to game time. To be effective and to allow time for digestion, larger meals should be eaten at least three to five hours before a game. Within two hours of a game, players should have just a light snack that is high in energy (carbohydrates) and easy to digest.

      After a game, players should eat a snack to restore lost energy and wait approximately one hour before eating a full meal. Excessive fatigue after a game may be a sign of improper nutrition before a game.

      Water and Sports Drinks

      Water is an important part of the energy process. Players should drink as much water as they can before, during, and after a game without causing stomach discomfort.

      Sports drinks have a limited amount of value when players are not sweating a large amount. However, if players are sweating enough to lose body weight, then a sports drink may provide some benefit.

      Nutritional Supplements

      The use of caffeine, nutrition bars, and other items that promise quick energy usually indicate insufficient attention to other areas such as rest, nutrition, and exercise. A rested player in good physical condition should not require these energy shortcuts. Other supplements that promise muscle development or extra strength typically have side effects and should be used only after consulting a doctor.

      Like so many other things about sports, there are no shortcuts when it comes to nutrition. A consistent diet of good foods in balanced meals, combined with exercise, is the best way to have sufficient energy during a game or practice.

      Nutrition Timelines

      Proper nutrition and rest need to be monitored prior to a sports event. The following timelines can help plan eating and resting before any heavy physical activity.

      Afternoon or Evening Event

      • Good night’s rest (day before)
      • Healthy meal (3-5 hours before)
      • Lots of water
      • Light snack (1-2 hours before)
      • Game or practice

      Morning Event

      • Healthy dinner and good night’s rest (day before)
      • Lots of water
      • Moderate snack (1-2 hours before)
      • Game or practice

      Important Tips to Keep Players Safe From Concussions

      10/01/2010, 10:32pm CDT
      By MN Hockey

      Concussions....

      From MN Hockey website:

      Every coach in every sport has athletes at risk for concussions. A concussion is a brain injury caused by a blow to the head. Concussions are certainly more prevalent in high impact sports like football and hockey. But concussions can happen in any sport where athletes are at risk for uncontrolled collisions or falls.

       

      Preventing Concussions -We can help prevent concussions by being vigilant about creating a safe environment for our athletes. Be aware of the surroundings in terms of walls, equipment, slippery courts or fields, or other environmental factors which could increase the risk of injury. Make sure all equipment is worn properly. Make sure all rules are followed in practice and competition. Keep an eye open for ‘out of control’ games where play is getting dangerously physical in violation of the rules. And, respond immediately to any head injury.

      Detecting Concussions – As we supervise our athletes it is important to remember that concussions do not always involve a devastating blow. Depending on the athlete and the circumstances, even a light blow to the head can result in a concussion. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that we look for these signs and symptoms in our athletes:

      • Dazed or stunned
      • Confused about assignment or position
      • Forgets sports plays
      • Unsure of game, score, or opponent
      • Moves clumsily
      • Answers questions slowly
      • Loses consciousness (even briefly)
      • Shows behavior or personality changes
      • Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall
      • Can’t recall events after hit or fall
      • Headache or “pressure” in head
      • Nausea or vomiting
      • Balance problems or dizziness
      • Double or blurry vision
      • Sensitivity to light
      • Sensitivity to noise
      • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
      • Concentration or memory problems
      • Confusion
      • Does not “feel right”

      Responding to Concussions -If  our athletes display any of the above signs and symptoms we need to respond immediately. The CDC recommends that coaches take the following steps to respond to an athlete with a concussion:

      • Remove the athlete from play.
      • Ensure that the athlete is evaluated right away by an appropriate health care professional. Do not try to judge the severity of the injury yourself.
      • Inform the athlete’s parents or guardians about the possible concussion.
      • Allow the athlete to return to play only with permission from a health care professional with experience in evaluating for concussions.

      Second Impact Syndrome – The first concussion is bad enough. But one often overlooked aspect of concussions is second impact syndrome. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), “A repeat concussion that occurs before the brain recovers from the first—usually within a short period of time (hours, days, or weeks)—can slow recovery or increase the likelihood of having long-term problems. In rare cases, repeat concussions can result in brain swelling, permanent brain damage, and even death. This more serious condition is called second impact syndrome.”

      Second impact syndrome is a special concern for highly committed athletes who want to play very soon after sustaining a concussion. This is where the coach has to step up and do the right thing. The CDC advises, “Keep athletes with known or suspected concussions from play until they have been evaluated and given permission to return to play by a health care professional with experience in evaluating concussions. Remind your athletes: ‘It’s better to miss one game than the whole season.’”

      Getting Educated – We can help protect our athletes by getting educated about concussions. We can never completely eliminate the possibility of this injury, but we can reduce the risk by knowing how to prevent it, detect it, respond to it, and protect athletes with a history of concussions.

      H1N1 Flu & You

      10/27/2009, 7:45pm CDT
      By ns

      H1N1 Flu & You